Reports

Our donors rightly demand results, backed by hard evidence. Hand in Hand Zimbabwe produces regular reports – in-house and across the network – to measure and monitor progress.

09 / 10 / 2017

2017 Jobs Creation Report

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10 / 01 / 2015

Solutions for Youth Employment – Toward Solutions for Youth Employment, 2015

Solutions for Youth Employment is a multistakeholder coalition initiated by the World Bank, International Labor Organization and RAND, among others. This baseline report considers the youth employment landscape, exploring its problems and solutions.

In brief:

  • “Entrepreneurship-promotion interventions activate the highest return on productive
    work for young people, especially when combined with access to finances.”
  • “Most jobs in fragile and post-conflict states will likely come from the informal sector, not the formal private sector.”
  • “Skills programs that focus on entrepreneurship have been more effective, especially when they combine training with cash grants. The relative success of entrepreneurship programs combined with cash in fragile environments has revived attention to microfinance for enterprise promotion.”

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04 / 01 / 2014

CGAP, World Bank Group – Focus note on Financial Inclusion and Development: Recent Impact Evidence, 2014

This focus note reviews the most recent impact assessments on microfinance and financial inclusion and confirms a belief we have acted on for a long time – that mobilizing credit is as important as micro-lending.

In brief:

  • Savings have the most consistent positive impact of all different financial services. Savings help households manage cash flow spikes, smooth consumption, as well as build working capital.
  • Small businesses benefit from access to credit by helping people invest in assets and grow their enterprises.
  • The impact of credit on a household’s broader welfare is less clear.

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01 / 01 / 2013

International Finance Corporation, World Bank Group – Assessing private sector contributions to job creation and poverty reduction, 2013

In brief:

  • Lack of access to finance is a key constraint to job creation, particularly for micro, small, and medium enterprises. Companies with access to finance have higher job-growth rates than businesses without it.
  • Training and skills-development programs are crucial. Adequate skills are important not only for workers but also for business owners to grow their enterprise and create more jobs.
  • Women influence the productivity and competitiveness of future generations by reinvesting 90 percent of their income into their families and rearing children for success. If women don’t have the opportunity to contribute economically, the years of investment in their education also is wasted. Equality of employment opportunities for men and women is associated with reduced poverty and higher GDP levels.

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12 / 01 / 2012

World Bank, World Development Report: Jobs, 2013

The report takes jobs in the development process as its starting point and reframes how we think about work.

In brief:

  • The development payoffs from jobs include empowering women, stabilizing post-conflict societies, poverty reduction, economy-wide productivity growth, and social cohesion.
  • Female employment matters beyond the individual – jobs for women can change the way households spend money and invest in the education and health of children.
  • The potential gains from greater entrepreneurial vibrancy, and from a more substantial reallocation of labor from low- to high-productivity units, are sizeable.

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01 / 01 / 1970

Overseas Development Institute - Informal is the new normal

This paper from the Overseas Development Institute considers the scale of the informal economy in the developing world – Hand in Hand’s locus of intervention, where enterprises aren’t registered and workers lack legal and social protection. It also makes a series of policy recommendations for improving those workers’ circumstances.

In short, the informal economy is huge and getting bigger, and governments should promote universal healthcare, pensions and minimum wages to make sure informal workers aren’t left behind.

In brief:

  • “Gelb and Khan (2016) show that the number of people seeking jobs may be ten times the number of officially unemployed, stating that 2 billion working-age people (two-thirds of whom are women) are classified as ‘outside the labour force.”
  • “IMF estimates suggest that, in low-income SSA, the informal sector – both self-employment an agricultural employment – presently accounts for about 90% of the 400 million existing jobs.”
  • “It is highly likely that the number of jobs needed will outstrip the capacity of formal labour markets to supply them.”
  • “While increasing access to capital can help tackle barriers to enterprise establishment and growth, ensuring improvement across a range of areas – including income, well-being and empowerment – requires access to capital to be just one element of an integrated, comprehensive approach to improving outcomes in the informal economy.”

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