Bulilima District Enterprise Competition prize-handover ceremony

Hand in Hand Zimbabwe (HiHZim) on Wednesday handed over chemicals and detergent-making equipment worth US$1 000 to Tjonanayila Self Help Group (SHG) from Ward 4 Bulilima District.

The seven-member group, which manufacturers washing soap – both in liquid and bar form – as well as petroleum jelly, was the first runner up at the inaugural HiHZim Market Linkages Project (MLP) Enterprise competition held in Bulilima District in March, and received a US$1 000 productive investment voucher for its sterling performance in detergent making.

Great Hope SHG won the competition and was awarded a productive investment voucher valued at US$1 500 after it successfully set up a horticultural garden in Ward 1.

Imvuselelo (SHG) who are running a goat and poultry enterprise in Ward 14 took the third prize and walked away with a US$500 productive investment voucher.

Although Tjonanayila became the first group in Bulilima to receive its prize, inputs for the other two groups have already been purchased and are set to be handed over this month.

Zanele Maseko, a member of Tjonanayila SHG, could not contain her happiness on receiving the equipment that is expected to ramp up production and improve the group members’ livelihoods.

“We are very excited to receive this equipment. We will now be able to make more soap and petroleum jelly, which are currently on demand due to the COVID-19 Pandemic,” she said in an interview.

In line with international COVID-19 safety guidelines, the handover ceremony was attended by less than 50 stakeholders from various Government Ministries, group members and local leadership.

Brighton Dube, Bulilima District Area Manager said the Market Linkages Project was a shot in the arm for local entrepreneurs and would speed up economic transformation in the district.

“The project came at the right time to address issues of marketing. Before Hand in Hand introduced the Market Linkages Project entrepreneurs were producing only enough to satisfy the immediate market, that is, people close to them as they did not have the capacity to produce enough to meet the huge demand in the district,” he said.

“This project is an opportunity not only for the group or ward but for the whole district because people in the district were relying on soap and other detergents from South Africa or Botswana. Now they will get within their proximity at affordable prices.

“Our aim is help this group to be the major supplier of soap and other detergents in the district. Our major markets being Greens, Plumtree bakery supermarket and all general dealers in the district,” Dube added.

Hand in Hand Zimbabwe has held the enterprise competitions in all the organisation’s seven (7) districts of operation namely Bulilima, Chikomba, Chirumanzu, Gwanda, Lupane, Nkayi and Shurugwi and to date prizes worth more than US$21 000 have been handed over.

The organisation, which has a huge presence in the selected districts, is using the competition to support entrepreneurs with productive investment capital that will enhance their produce so as to grow their businesses and access better markets.

The Market Linkages Project is a three-year programme that commenced in June 2019 is set to end in May 2022 and targets 512 entrepreneurs – 60% youth and 40% adults. The project seeks to reinforce access to markets and access to finance for entrepreneurs supported by Hand in Hand Zimbabwe. This involves complimenting already established enterprises under JCP, MEY, Green Enterprises and CUP through strengthening access to finance and market linkages in selected value chains such as horticulture, small livestock, apiculture and food processing in order to boost productivity, competitiveness, high income and sustainability.

Entrepreneurs in selected enterprises are expected to receive specific technical trainings, tailor-made according to their individual needs. Technical skills support the entrepreneurs in their enterprises thereby increasing productivity.

Through the Market Linkages Project, entrepreneurs are capacitated to form cluster and commodity associations for collective efficiency in marketing. Look and learn exchange visits of cluster committees are undertaken. Enterprise Competitions are held between participating groups to enhance competitiveness.

Through this project, entrepreneurs are capacitated on market engagement, conducting market survey including full market assessment on high value markets. Entrepreneurs undergo trainings, mentoring and coaching sessions on engaging with markets to enhance their bargaining skills.

To increase productivity, Hand in Hand Zimbabwe´s revolving fund plays a pivotal role in boosting the enterprises supported by the project in the form of micro-loans. Microloans are facilitated through the Revolving Fund as well as through contacts with external financial linkages. Hand in Hand Zimbabwe coordinates with micro-finance and lending institutions with a view of promoting access to alternative sources of funds. Hand in Hand Zimbabwe, however, seeks to ensure that 60% of the population benefitting from loans are women and youth.

Through this project, Hand in Hand Zimbabwe facilitates platforms for entrepreneurs to network with other value chain actors through market fairs at ward and district level and participation in business expos and exhibitions where entrepreneurs market and sell their products.

Hand in Hand Zimbabwe is a non-profit organization that builds socio-economic resilient communities as coping mechanisms against shocks resulting from economic decline, poor performing economy, climate change, disproportionate socio-political equilibrium, health crisis. The shocks threaten household food security and livelihoods. This, the organization achieves by increasing economic opportunities of target population through delivering modular entrepreneurial development training, which is integrated with cross-cutting components such as motivation, health, gender, and environment. Thus, Hand in Hand Zimbabwe commits itself to implementing sustainable interventions that contribute to fighting challenges such as food insecurity, poverty and an unattainable economy and effects of climate change that threaten individual and household wellbeing. Hand in Hand Zimbabwe has a six (6) module business development training that is delivered over six (6) months and cross cutting manuals in gender, environment and motivation on which target group capacitation is premised on.

The organisation was registered as development Trust in July 2015 and as a Private Voluntary Organisation (PVO) on the 5th of May 2020.

The organization presently operates in the following districts: Bulilima and Gwanda in Matabeleland South Province, Lupane and Nkayi in Matabeleland North Province, Chirumanzu and Shurugwi in Midlands Province and Chikomba district in Mashonaland East Province.

Hand in Hand Zimbabwe Gwanda District COVID-19 response

Hand in Hand Zimbabwe continues with its humanitarian drive of distributing food hampers to vulnerable and marginalised people in rural communities.

The organisation donated 22 more food hampers consisting of 20kg mealie meal, 3kg soya chunks, 3kg sugar beans, 2kg salt, 5 kg flour, 6kg sugar, 3 units bathing soap and 3 bars of washing soap to families in Ward 4 and Ward 13 Gwanda district who are struggling to make ends meet due to effects of COVID-19.

Rubbie Musikambesa, a 68-year-old widow, who stays with 14 grandchildren – nine of them orphans – in Switsha village (Ward 13) could not hide her joy for receiving such a timely donation in difficult times.

“The Covid-19 pandemic lockdown affected our lives in the sense that we are failing to access basic social services and we were even unable to carry out our daily socio economic activities that help us to earn a living. We are therefore grateful, to Hand in Hand Zimbabwe and its partners for this Covid-19 response by distributing food hampers,” she said.

Gogo Musikambesa said she had no idea where her next meal was going to come from and would remain appreciative to HiH Zimbabwe.

“My only source of income is through selling of mopane worms (Amacimbi), but I haven’t been able to go and harvest the insects due to restrictions imposed by the lockdown. The situation has also been worsened by the current drought which killed four of my five cows,” she said.

The beneficiary added that her family has now resorted to having two paltry meals a day as a surviving strategy in the face of food deficit.

With Covid-19 cases rising in the country and the informal sector still closed, vulnerable groups who survive from hand to mouth are bearing the brunt as Zimbabwe’s food insecurity situation looms.

HiHZim Bulilima District COVID-19 donation

Hand in Hand Zimbabwe last week donated grocery hampers to 10 people living with disabilities, 11 elderly and one child-headed family in Ward 1 Bulilima district as part of the organisation’s efforts to fight hunger in vulnerable communities during the COVID-19 Pandemic.

This comes as the disabled and the elderly are facing the brunt of the pandemic due to lack of social safety nets. With this in mind, HiH Zim partnered with the Government of Zimbabwe – through the department of Social Welfare – to ensure that grocery hampers reach the intended community members.

To guarantee transparency and fairness in food distribution, selection of the beneficiaries was jointly conducted by the local leadership and the department of Social Welfare, while home visits were also done to assess household needs.

Bulilima District, which falls in the dry agro-ecological regions of IV & V, has lost most of its productive population to neighbouring countries leaving only the elderly and young children. Under normal circumstances, the diaspora population send remittances to the rural population.

But with neighbouring countries on lockdown and informal trading at a halt, remittances are no longer coming. The situation has been made worse by the fact that most of the people living in neighbouring countries are now coming back home and are in quarantine centres, thus depriving the vulnerable people in the border-line district of the much-needed income.

HiHZim Chikomba District COVID-19 Donation

Hand in Hand Zimbabwe continues to complement government efforts to reduce the harsh economic effects of the #COVID-19 Lockdown in rural areas through the distribution of grocery hampers to vulnerable households in its seven districts of operation.

Pictures show the distribution of grocery hampers, containing cooking oil, mealie-meal, sugar beans, sugar, salt, flour, tea leaves, soya chunks and soap, to 22 vulnerable households recently in Ward 8 Shurugwi district. The beneficiaries were also given brochures and flyers with more information about Covid-19, and taught the importance of washing their hands frequently using tippy taps.

Many rural entrepreneurs are unable to access markets to sell produce or to buy inputs as a result of the national lockdown aimed at curtailing the spread of the pandemic in the country through movement restrictions. The current situation is now putting a strain on household food security and income generation.

As part of efforts to meet the growing need of food security for vulnerable household in Rural Zimbabwe, HiHZim in partnership with Hand in Hand Sweden is exploring ways of securing more resources to support people in marginalised communities.

HiHZim Chikomba District Donation

Hand in Hand Zimbabwe last week donated Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) and disinfectants to frontline medical personnel at Bvumbura Clinic in, Ward 2 and Rutanhira Clinic in Ward 23 Chikomba district as part of efforts to curb the spread of Covid-19. Each clinic received a consignment consisting of 10 litres Hydrogen Peroxide, nine boxes of latex gloves, 300 surgical masks, 10-litre bucket, 5 litres liquid soap, 5 litres hand wash, a knapsack sprayer, hand spray bottle and 10 green bar soaps.

As part of efforts to curb the spread of Covid-19, HIH Zim, which is also at the forefront of raising Covid-19 awareness in rural and marginalised areas, took the opportunity to distribute 60 green bar soaps, brochures, flyers and posters to community members who were present at the two health centres.

Health workers at the two medical facilities could not hide their joy after receiving the life-saving equipment and clothing. “The donation will go a long way in assisting us to prevent the spread of Covid-19 as we are constantly exposed to various patients with different ailments from the community,” said a Nurse Aid at Rutanhira Clinic.

HiHZim in fight against COVID-19

As part of its COVID-19 response, Hand in Hand Zimbabwe (HiHZim) will be rolling out a number of COVID- 19 humanitarian activities which include the distribution of food hampers, awareness material, Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) and disinfectants to front line staff and other essential service providers in the seven (7) national districts it operates in.

This intervention will benefit more than 300 000 community members in 82 wards, 35 Rural Health Centres, 400 health staff and 35 local partners in the seven districts, namely Bulilima, Chikomba, Chirumanzu, Gwanda, Lupane, Nkayi and Shurugwi.

Distributions of the food hampers and other material will be done under special arrangements line with the World Health Organisation (WHO) safety guidelines.

Food hampers, awareness material, Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) and disinfectants ready to be delivered to districts.

Part of Hand in Hand Zimbabwe interventions will also include Information dissemination in local languages to create and raise awareness on COVID-19. Posters, brochures and flyers on COVID-19 risk awareness have been developed and will be distributed in all the seven districts.

In an Interview Hand in Hand Zimbabwe Chief Executive Officer (CEO) Felix Tete said the organisation has put up some strategies which will be implemented over a 3-month period to support the government in mitigating adverse effects and the impact of COVID-19.

“The health crisis in Zimbabwe calls in for Civil Society Organisations (CSOs) including those working with the rural communities to support government in raising awareness and putting up responsive measures in preventing the spread of COVID-19.

“With the COVID-19 pandemic and economic slowdown threatening the lives and livelihoods of vulnerable rural communities, we have come up with strategies that include; Information dissemination /distribution of IEC Material and distribution of PPE to health centres and health professionals.

He added that the organisation is assisting vulnerable families in communities it operates in with food hampers after having noted that, the COVID-19 pandemic may push rural families even deeper into poverty, hunger and desperation.

“With movements restricted to contain further spread of the virus in the country, many of our entrepreneurs are unable to access markets to sell produce or to buy inputs thus putting a strain on household food security and income generation.

“Hand in Hand Zimbabwe will however do its best to ensure food security for vulnerable households,” Tete said.

Having noted that there has been a spike of Gender Based Violence (GBV) cases due to the COVID 19 Lockdown, Hand in Hand Zimbabwe will also work with the District COVID-19 Task Teams to disseminate information on GBV and how to prevent it. This will be done in partnership with the Ministry of Women Affairs Small and Medium Enterprises Development and the Zimbabwe Republic Police (ZRP) Victim Friendly Unit (VFU).

Infection control accessories such as tippy tap hand washing facilities and liquid soap will also be distributed to water sources, business centres, and community gardens to help contain the spread of Covid-19.

Apart from the upcoming intervention, Hand in Hand Zimbabwe has for the past 4 years supported rural communities in Bulilima, Chikomba, Chirumanzu, Gwanda and Nkayi with access to clean water and sanitary facilities.

To date, the organisation has installed at least 9 Solar powered boreholes and supplied building material for eight garden Blair toilets which will go a long way in providing water and sanitation for over 9000 community members for use in managing and mitigating the spread and effects of COVID-19 pandemic.

In Zimbabwe, just like in many developing countries, many rural communities lack access to clean water which is a prerequisite to good hygiene. With that in mind, Hand in Hand Zimbabwe (HiH Zim) has through the support of its valued donors extended efforts in providing clean water and sanitation which does not only benefit its entrepreneurs but the communities at large.

HiHZim Bulilima enterprise competition a huge success

THREE Self Help Groups (SHGs) walked away with prizes worth three thousand dollars (3000usd) at the inaugural Hand in Hand Zimbabwe Market Linkages Project (MLP) Enterprise competition held in Ward 1 Bulilima District on Monday.

Great Hope SHG, which has successfully set up a horticultural garden in Ward 1, won the competition and was awarded a productive investment voucher valued at US$1 500.  Tjonanayila was the first runner up and received a US$1 000 productive investment voucher for its sterling performance in detergent making in Ward 4.

Imvuselelo SHG, which is into goat rearing and poultry in ward 14 took the third prize, and walked away with a US$500 productive investment voucher.

Bulilima Rural District Council Assistant Executive Social Services Officer Mbonisi Moses Maphosa, who was Guest of Honour at the event, commended the enterprise competition as it helps to boost the winning entrepreneurs’ businesses and encourages others to work harder.

“Hand in Hand Zimbabwe modular trainings have really helped entrepreneurs, the way they do business has now improved and it quite impressive. The provision of look and learn tours and linking entrepreneurs to markets through commodity clusters and expos has also helped them improve sales and as a result improve their livelihoods,” he said.

Maphosa encouraged members to register their SHGs as companies and also come up with sustainability strategies.

Patience Zambuko, a member of Great Hope self-help group, said the prize money will go a long way in growing their horticultural garden, which will in turn improve the livelihoods of members and support local communities.

“We are very excited for winning the first prize. It’s exhilarating to know that someone has recognised all our hard work and efforts. We will soon sit down and decide how to invest our prize,” she said in an interview.

The successful competition, which attracted more than 300 community members, was made lively by entertainment from the clearly happy entrepreneurs.

Various stakeholders from Government Ministries, entrepreneurs, community leaders, other Self Help Groups, Headman, Village heads, and Chiefs were also in attendance at the enterprise competitions.

The enterprise competitions will also take place in the organisation’s remaining six (6) districts of operation namely Chikomba, Chirumanzu, Gwanda, Lupane, Nkayi and Shurugwi in the next two (2) months.

Hand in Hand Zimbabwe which has a huge presence in the selected districts, is using the competitions to support entrepreneurs with investment capital that will enhance their produce so as to grow their businesses and access better markets.

The Market Linkages Project focuses on complimenting already established enterprises under Hand in Hand Zimbabwe projects such as the Jobs Creation Project, Motivated and Entrepreneurial Youth Project, Green Enterprises Project and Community Upliftment Project through strengthening access to finance and market linkages in selected value chains such as horticulture, small livestock, apiculture and food processing in order to boost productivity, competitiveness, high income and sustainability.

The three-year project which commenced in June 2019 is set to end in May 2022 and targets 512 entrepreneurs. It is fully funded by the Osterberg Foundation.

Solar-powered boreholes for rural Gwanda

Hand in Hand Zimbabwe (HiH Zim) is pressing ahead with its goals of transforming livelihoods of rural people across the country.

Through its Green Enterprise Project, HiH Zim has installed four (4) solar-powered boreholes in four (4) community gardens in Gwanda district, a development that has seen farmers in the area increasing crop production.

Gwanda, which falls within agro-ecological region V and receives annual average rainfall of 477mm has a record of many cases of crop failure.

The district has not experience above normal rainfall over the past 10 years and meaningful crop production is only under irrigation.

The installation of the solar boreholes has however brought relief to many HiH Zim entrepreneurs.  Previously they struggled to sustain their crops as they had to walk long distances to fetch water from wells.

To date, gardens in the area, which boats of an array of crops such as butternut, potatoes, tomatoes, beans, chomolia and nursery trees, are a refreshing sight in this drought-prone area.

HiH Zim Chief Executive Officer (CEO) Felix Tete said the provision of the solar boreholes is part of the organisation’s strategy to promote the use of Green energy in the District, while at the same time creating jobs and building socio economically resilient communities.

Sympathy Ngulube (34) from Sinalidau garden in Ward 20, praised HiH Zim for helping to develop her impoverished community in the past three years.

“The business trainings and provision of technical support from Hand in Hand Zimbabwe has opened our minds,” said the mother of four in an interview.

“We have been taught a lot and on top of that water woes that we were facing are now a thing of the past because we can easily water our crops.

“In the past our gardening projects were not doing so well because we would get tired of walking long distances to fetch water but the installation of the solar boreholes has eased our load. As a group we are looking forward to our first harvesting season in the coming few months,” she said.

Sympathy indicated that her group will soon be selling their butternut crop to local markets in the district.

“Our plan is to buy cattle and goats as a form of investments from the proceeds of our crops,” she added.

Tsamikan Sebata from Progressive garden in Ward 14, said she had been living in abject poverty for years as a result of poor harvests induced by drought in the district but the solar boreholes have come as a relief.

She said although the 45-member group recently started selling their produce, they are looking forward to earning a sustainable income from the sales.

“The Green Enterprise Project is proving to be helpful in the district as it has revamped production in our garden. In addition, the project has also empowered our youth, and families as well as our community in terms of job creation and building socio-economic resilience,” she said.

The project created 490 green jobs and 34 green enterprises in the past year and there are good prospects for growth this year.

Tsamikan said the group is currently reinvesting back into the garden through buying seedlings and they are all optimistic that the project will be self-sustaining in the near future.

“This project is not only helping us with new income streams for our families, but is also opening our eyes to various opportunities,” the mother of three said.

Since their garden has a provision of tree nurseries, Sebata said the group sells tree seedlings at $15 each.

About 63 types of fruit trees that include mango, guava, lemons and pawpaw have been planted in the garden.

The group members are also looking forward to selling their butternut and tomatoes, which will be ready for harvest soon.

The market for their produce is in Gwanda town and surrounding communities.

Phakamani and Sengezane gardens in Ward 14, where HiH Zim also installed solar-powered water boreholes, are realising high yields in their butternut crop production, which they plan to sell beginning of March.

Loreen Mpondo (62) said she is confident the proceeds from the garden will go a long way in improving their lives.

Since its inception more than 15 months ago, the Green Enterprise Project has established three apiaries, five tree nurseries, and five nutritional gardens with a provision of fodder for cattle and goat fattening

The Green Enterprises Project is one of the economically and environmentally viable projects that has been adopted by Hand in Hand Zimbabwe as a pilot venture in Gwanda district. The project was incepted in September 2018 and is expected to run until August 2021. The project seeks to achieve improved sustainable economic activities and strengthen resilience to climate change for the resource-constrained communities – particularly women and young people.

This goal will be achieved through climate-smart agriculture (irrigated horticulture) and beekeeping.

These interventions are part and parcel of climate change adaptive strategies. By its very nature the project targets to benefit 80% women and 20% men in Ward 6,7,14 and 20 in Gwanda.

Hand in Hand Zimbabwe is a non-profit organization that helps resource limited and marginalized people in rural communities, particularly women and youth, to create better livelihoods for themselves and their families through its flagship series, the Jobs Creation Programme (JCP). JCP encompasses a self-help approach that is premised on a four-pillar model involving social mobilization into self-help groups (SHGs), training in entrepreneurship and economic development, facilitating access to microloans and facilitating market linkages and value addition.

Apart from the Jobs Creation Programme, the organisation has over the past four years incepted the Motivated and Entrepreneurial Youth (MEY) project, Community Upliftment Programme (CUP), Green Enterprises Project (GEP) and Jobs for Zimbabwe (JFZ) project, Market Linkages Project (MLP) and the Daughters of Africa project (DOA).

The organisation was registered as a non-profit trust in Zimbabwe in July 2015 and is presently supporting communities in seven (7) districts namely Bulilima, Chikomba, Chirumanzu, Gwanda, Lupane, Nkayi and Shurugwi.

HiHZim Business Development Manager Lindani Maphosa featured on ZBCTV news

Yesterday our Business Development Manager Lindani Maphosa was featured on ZBCTV news, where she articulated how the organisation is building socio-economic resilience in communities as a strategy to help farmers cope with shocks that may result from adverse weather conditions, economic challenges, socio-political challenges and gender disparities.

In the past 12 months, the organisation trained 3 500 women in business skills and entrepreneurship – bringing the total number of trained individuals to 12 000 since 2015. Next year, we will continue with our goals and objectives of building socio-economically resilient communities.

Chikomba Tree planting day commemorations

Hand in Hand Zimbabwe, in collaboration with the Forestry Commission, handed 200 citrus seedlings to Mushandike and Huchu Self-Help Groups in Chikomba district on Tuesday during the National Tree Planting Day commemorations.


Hand in Hand will contribute another 90 seedlings to three groups under its Community Upliftment Project in a bid to promote environmental and climate change awareness. This will contribute to enhanced biodiversity and increased food security.

The event attracted a sizeable crowd that included officials from the Environmental Management Agency, local council, traditional leaders, members of the community, local schools and the District Development Coordinator, who was the guest of honour.

Gwanda villagers respond to climate change

SAMIKANG Sebata (56), a villager under Chief Nhlamba in Matabeleland South, has finally tasted economic freedom.

For many years, the mother of three has been living in abject poverty in her home area in Gwanda district, which has continuously suffered poor harvests due to drought.

Last season, was no different owing to the El Nino-induced drought.

Sebata planted several agricultural crops like maize for sustenance but the drought that is blamed on climate change saw her crops wilt before they matured, leaving her family food insecure.

Gwanda falls within the dry regions of the country, receiving very little rainfall each year, which makes it to susceptible to agricultural crop failures.

But following the introduction of the Green Enterprise Project in her area by a non-profit organisation, Hand in Hand Zimbabwe (HHZ), Sebata is a relieved person.

The Green Enterprises project is one of the economically and environmentally viable projects adopted by HHZ, being implemented in Gwanda district first as a pilot project.

Running from September 2018 to August 2021, the project seeks to achieve improved sustainable economic activities and strengthened resilience to climate change for the resource constrained, particularly women and youth.

In Gwanda, HHZ helped 45 villagers, including women and youth, to set up an enterprise known as the Progressive Garden in ward 14 where fruit trees and various vegetables are grown for sustenance and commercial purposes.

The project, sitting on 0,8 hectares of land, uses a solar-powered borehole.

“When Hand in Hand introduced this project to us, we did not understand their vision but now we do.

“We have realised that this project will bring about massive development into this community.

“With this project, our future is bright,” Sebata, who is the Progressive Garden chairperson, said.

“It will help empower our children, and families as well as our community.

“As time goes on, this project will be sustaining our lives. It will be our bank of some sort.

“The project will also help us to assist our husbands back home in terms of bringing in income for family upkeep.

“Some of us have become breadwinners through this project.”

Apart from selling fruits from these trees, women also sell tree seedlings for $15 each.

So far, they have sold more than 100 tree seedlings and have 1 083 that are ready for the market.

About 63 types of fruit trees that include mango, guava, lemons and pawpaw have been planted in the garden.

The market for their produce is in Gwanda town and surrounding communities.

HHZ area manager Unami Dube told Sunday Southern Eye, during national tree planting day commemorations held in Gwanda recently that the project will benefit 80% women and 20% men. Of the total figure, at least 30% should be youth.

Dube said taking on board women and youths in economic activities will enhance their participation in decision making at household and community level.

She said this will help to reduce their vulnerability to all forms of abuse.

“The reason why we started this project is that we wanted to mitigate against climate change effects,” Dube said.

“So that’s why we came up with a project that is in line with climate resilience.

“We, therefore, decided to do gardens where these villagers will grow vegetables and fruit trees, among others.”

The project is expected to help establish at least 300 individual projects and 30 group enterprises around the country that are adaptive to climate change shocks, increase the income generation of the entrepreneur and also to have individuals employed in a green enterprise as holders of green jobs.

Progressive Garden member Mandile Dube said the project will help sustain their families.

“We are grateful to Hand in Hand Zimbabwe.

“We are now empowered,” she said, adding that for vegetables, they have cultivated tomatoes, butternut, rape and leaf vegetable chomolia.

Village head Mbazo Dube described the project as a life saver.

“It will give us life. I would like to encourage these women to work hard. This is a noble project that is needed in the community,” Mbazo said.

There are about 170 homesteads in the area where the project is located.

“This project will grow and as a community we are very grateful,” another villager, Christopher Magwala, said.

Agritex official Gloria Bulala commended HHZ for coming up with the project, saying it will contribute a lot towards food security.

Gwanda deputy district development coordinator Judge Dube said the project will assist Zimbabwe to achieve Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) number 2 and 15.

SDG 2 seeks to end hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture while SDG 15 seeks to protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forests, combat desertification, halt and reverse land degradation and biodiversity loss.

“As you may be aware, Gwanda falls within the dry regions of the country, receiving very little rainfall each year,” Judge said.

“This makes the district susceptible to agricultural crop failures, and, therefore, growing fruit trees becomes a strategic fallback position hedging farmers against hunger.

“Trees are naturally more resilient in harsh weather conditions than agricultural crops.”

“Food and nutrition security remains one of the critical focal areas, and is a key deliverable that will ensure the attainment of the upper middle income economy status by 2030.”

He said trees and forests played a fundamental role in environmental management and mitigate the effects of climate change, Judge said their preservation is critical for a sustainable environment.

Article 5 of the Paris agreement recognises the role that trees and forests play in mitigating climate change effects by converting carbon dioxide into oxygen.

“Trees also provide additional income and dietary diversity enabling our communities to cope with shocks from climatic change effects such as droughts,” Judge added.

“Fruit tress offer a multiplicity of nutrients to our communities, reducing occurrences of diseases that are related to poor diets like blindness.”

He said climate change and climate variability had made agriculture activities unsustainable and that non-timber forest products could be used to supplement agriculture.

Zimbabwe has not been spared from the devastating effects of climate change which have a negative bearing on food security.

More than seven million people in Zimbabwe — about a third of the population — need food aid, with many coming close to starving, according to the United Nations.

To mitigate against climate change effects, Forestry Commission provincial manager Bekezela Tshuma said villagers should stop deforestation.

He said the deforestation rate in the country stood at 300 000 ha per year while in Matabeleland South province alone it was pegged at 5000 ha.

The province is targeting to plant more than 20 000 trees in all districts.

HHZ programmes director Emmanuel Makiwa said they were hoping to implement the project successfully so that they can get more funds before cascading it to other districts.

“It’s still a pilot project; once the donors are happy with what we are doing they will provide more funds to cascade it,” he said.

“The project here is targeting about 300 people. Our objective actually is to provide a dripping system but for now we don’t have the money for drip system, that’s why we are putting taps.

“We are going to add some more watering taps. Then if we get more funds we put an irrigation system.”

HHZ is a non-profit organisation whose main aim is to help poor and marginalised people create better livelihoods for themselves and their families in rural Zimbabwe.

This is done through a help to self-help approach, mainly aimed at women and youth.

Through its interventions, the organisation has made great strides in the fight against poverty in Lupane, Nkayi, Bulilima, Gwanda, Shurugwi, Chikomba and Chirumhanzu.

“With such projects, we are saying good-bye to poverty and malnutrition. We are now economically empowered,” Sebata said.

HiHZim in effort to mitigate Climate change

Hand in Hand Zimbabwe (HiHZim) is heavily involved in projects that mitigate #Cimate Change through Green Enterprise (GE) Interventions.

For instance, the organisation was instrumental in establishing a GE pilot project in Gwanda, which has notched some positive impact in the area.

HiH Zim’s Chief Executive Officer recently toured Gwanda to have an appreciation of the project and was privileged to meet members of Progressive Self Help Group in ward 14, Phakamani and Sinalidau SHGs in ward 20 and Guyu in Sengezane Village.

The Groups have thriving tree nurseries in the hot and dry region, and plans are afoot for the teams to participate in this year’s national tree planting day in early December.

Since the Green Enterprise Project’s s inception close to 12 months ago, the project has established three apiaries, five lush tree nurseries, and five nutritional gardens with capacity to provide fodder for cattle and goat fattening.

The project has also created 490 green jobs and 34 green enterprises in the past year

HiHZim on Climate Change

Climate change continues to bring devastation and suffering to several rural communities in Africa with millions of people facing starvation each year due to perennial droughts and floods. To help reduce effects of climate change, Hand in Hand Zimbabwe (HiH Zim) has adopted a mitigation approach, which will not only curb climate change but also create Green jobs for resource-constrained community members.

Through the Green Enterprise and Community Upliftment Projects, HiH Zim is capacitating entrepreneurs under its portfolio – particularly women and youth – to implement sustainable projects that tackle climate change and its effects.

Some of the climate change adaptative strategies adopted by HiH Zim supported entrepreneurs in Gwanda, Bulilima, Chikomba, Chirumanzu, Lupane and Nkayi include climate-smart agriculture, tree planting, beekeeping, afforestation, reforestation and agroforestry among others.

HiH MEY Project coordinator heads to Mozambique, Sweden

We are excited that our Motivated and Entrepreneurial Youth (MEY) Project Coordinator Rejoyce Moyo has been selected to be part of a Southern African team attending an International Training Program on Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation. Rejoyce is currently in Maputo, Mozambique for the program and will proceed to Sweden in a few weeks for further trainings.

Celebrating the International Day of rural women

HiHZim Celebrates International Day of the Girl Child

As we celebrate the International Day of the Girl child, we commit to continue empowering the female child through our various projects on Motivation, Health, and Entrepreneurship.


We have noted the potential exhibited by the young girls through the success of their HiHZim supported projects and we believe their empowerment is key for a better tomorrow.

Reprieve for Bulilima District

Hand in Hand Zimbabwe interventions are proving to be valuable in helping community members in Bulilima District, where there are limited opportunities due to persistent adverse climatic conditions.

Women from Thokoza Self Help Group have successfully built a market stall, which will not only shield group members from different weather conditions but will also see entrepreneurs selling their various wares in a clean, protected and modest environment.

Another group from the same district, Thembelani Self Help Group boasts of a thriving enterprise – a flourishing vegetable and tomato garden. Group members are gaining financial independence through selling their produce.

Other entrepreneurs in the district have set-up diverse enterprises such as detergent making, poultry production, and goat rearing businesses to mention a few. These enterprises have been fully supported through Hand in Hand Zimbabwe’s Community Upliftment Project (CUP) and Jobs Creation Programme(JCP).

DOA annual meeting

Last week we attended the Daughters of Africa (DOA) project annual meeting in Namibia where we got an opportunity to be part of the Daughters of Africa Girls Seminar which was held at Namibia State University.

We also visited a Girls Club session on Gender-Based Violence at Immanuel Shifidi Secondary School.

The Daughters of Africa (DoA) Project aims to instill hope for the future of young people in Namibia and South Africa through training on health, motivation, livelihood, and entrepreneurship.

The project is being implemented by two (2) strategic partners, Hand in Hand Zimbabwe (HIH), an enterprise development-oriented organization and Star for Life (SFL) which has extensive experience in motivational and health awareness. Hand in Hand Sweden, Star for Life Sweden and South Africa offers technical support for the project.

The DoA project contributes to sustainable socio-economic development in South Africa and Namibia through the following target areas, reducing girls and young women’s risk of violence and sexual exploitation, strengthening their control over their sexual and reproductive health and Creating opportunities to secure economic independence for young women.
To achieve the desired result, DoA has adopted customized training facilitated by Hand in Hand Zimbabwe to strengthen the school children’s self-confidence in entrepreneurship.

Minister visits HiHZim Stand at Sanganai/Hlanganani Travel Expo

Acting Minister of Tourism, Environment and Hospitality Kirsty Coventry visited our stand at the ongoing Sanganai/Hlanganani Travel Expo in Bulawayo yesterday.

Coventry lauded the work we are doing. We are honored to have been one of the few organizations to host the Minister as a special guest and we are looking forward to building a rapport and a sustainable partnership with the Ministry in our quest to link Entrepreneurs to bigger markets

HiHZim at Sanganai 2019

Join us once again as we showcase wares and products made by entrepreneurs supported by Handinhand Zimbabwe at the #Sanganai/Hlanganani – World Tourism Expo. We are in Hall 3 stand number 03 from today to September 14, 2019.

Sanganai/Hlanganani – World Tourism Expo is an annual Tourism Trade Fair organized by the Zimbabwe Tourism Authority. It showcases the widest variety of Africa’s best tourism products, and attracts international visitors and we hope to link entrepreneurs to these markets.

Rural entrepreneurs featured at ZAS

Hand in Hand Zimbabwe, is using the Zimbabwe Agricultural Show (ZAS) and many other platforms to link emerging rural entrepreneurs with local and external markets in a bid to build socio-economically resilient communities.

The organisation took advantage of the ongoing ZAS and the Zimbabwe International Trade Fair in April to showcase wares and products from different and diverse enterprises owned by entrepreneurs in the seven districts of Bulilima, Chikomba, Chirumanzu, Gwanda, Lupane, Nkayi and Shurugwi, where it operates in.

The products and wares, exclusively made by entrepreneurs, include baskets, jams, dried vegetables, nutritional porridge and woven mats.

Hand in Hand Zimbabwe chief executive officer Felix Tete told NewsDay that his organisation would continue to link rising entrepreneurs with established markets.

“Our aim is to build socio-economically resilient communities, with a special focus on women and youths through various empowerment projects. We’ll continue to use various marketing platforms such as the ZAS to bring maximum exposure to our entrepreneurs,” he said.

Since 2015, the organisation has supported over 10 000 rural businesses, trained more than 17 000 entrepreneurs and has facilitated the creation of more than 11 000 jobs in rural Zimbabwe.

Gladys Nyoni (58), one of the entrepreneurs from ward 29 of Gwai, Lupane, whose wares were on exhibition at the Hand in Hand Zimbabwe stand at the agricultural show, said she was happy to be honoured to be at such a huge platform to market and sell her wares.

“Things are now hard and people on the other side constantly have no money to buy our wares, so I am very happy that we have managed to get customers from all walks of life including buyers from various countries in Southern Africa,” Nyoni said.

“I had been keeping these wares for five months with no linkages, but I’m happy I have finally managed to sell them. I feel empowered.”

Hand in Hand Zimbabwe helps marginalised people in rural communities, particularly women, to create better livelihoods for themselves and their families through its flagship project, the Jobs Creation Programme (JCP).

JCP encompasses a self-help approach that is premised on a four-pillar model involving social mobilisation into self-help groups; training in entrepreneurship and economic development; facilitating access to micro-finance and facilitating market linkages and value addition.

Reprieve for Chikomba District

Despite the harsh economic conditions being experienced in the country, members of Hand in Hand Zimbabwe supported Self Help Groups in Chikomba District now earn decent incomes through their various enterprises.

Instead of relying on food handouts, the groups have managed to develop collective enterprises that will go a long way in improving their livelihoods.
Hand in Hand Zimbabwe has made great strides in mobilizing and capacitating communities to form self-help groups and establish sustainable value chain enterprises.

HiHZim Celebrates 4th birthday.

It has been an amazing Four (4) years for all of us at Hand in Hand Zimbabwe. 29 July marks a very special day for the organisation and a huge credit goes to you all for your continued support!

HiHZim Community project spreads to more districts

HAND in Hand Zimbabwe (HIHZim) has extended its community upliftment project, which was only being implemented in Bulilima and Chikomba, to cover Chirumanzu, Lupane and Nkayi districts as part of strategies to fight poverty at a large scale among rural households in the country.

The project, which was already making a direct impact on 400 households in Bulilima and Chikomba is now set to benefit more than 1 000 households inclusive of the new districts.

HIHZ CEO Felix Tete said the extension of the project will go a long way in bringing about sustainable economic transformation to various households living in
these marginalised areas.

“Through the implementation of the community upliftment project, HIHZim seeks to reduce poverty in communities through building socio economically resilient
communities while at the same time engaging in climate smart environmental interventions,” he said.

To achieve this goal, Tete said the project facilitates the establishment of cohesive self-help groups and viable enterprises through five modular trainings in
self-help group strengthening and business development.

He said the project will also facilitate the respective communities’ capacity to support themselves through starting or strengthening group enterprises and
economic activities.

“The project’s activities encompass social mobilization, conducting business training, training entrepreneurs on environmentally friendly practices and climate
change, supporting garden enterprises through drilling boreholes and provision of fencing materials, establishing a market center with stalls, supporting food
processing enterprises with solar driers and linking entrepreneurs to markets,” he said.

Through the project, technical trainings will be conducted for the entrepreneurs as per need and these include value addition, gender mainstreaming, packaging
and branding.
Training of pump minders and post-harvest handling will also be conducted.

Tete said by the end of the project, rural households living in poverty and vulnerable situations will be equipped with entrepreneurial and managerial skills,
including savings and financial management.

“Environmentally friendly viable enterprises will also be established or enhanced in targeted communities and jobs are expected to be created.

“The project’s goal is to contribute to improved sustainable economic activities for the target population including women and youth (80%) and men (20%),” Tete
said.

Community upliftment project is a 30-month-initiative that commenced in June 2018 and will end in December 2020.

The project is implemented in partnership with Hand in Hand Sweden.

HiHZim hosts tree planting day commemoration

Hand in Hand Zimbabwe on Tuesday partnered with the Forestry Commission to host a tree planting day commemoration under its Green Enterprise Project in Gwanda district, Ward 14’s Progressive garden.

The inaugural event, which ran under the theme “Fruit trees for food security and nutrition”, was well attended by staff from AGRITEX and Forestry Commission, government officials, local leaders, community members and school children, who were all represented through various presentations.

Through the Green Enterprise Projects, Hand in Hand Zimbabwe is capacitating entrepreneurs under its portfolio – particularly women and youth – to implement sustainable projects that seek to reduce the impact of climate change in communities. Tree planting is one of the interventions aims at reducing carbon emissions and improving livelihoods. The Green Enterprise Project’s interventions include vegetable production in agroforestry plots, establishment of fodder banks and tree nurseries, bee keeping, tree planting and rangeland management.

Deputy District Development Coordinator Judge Dube, who was guest of honour at the event, bemoaned effects of climate change and urged community members to plant fruit trees.

“Trees are very important and l urge you to plant fruit trees in order to eradicate hunger. The work Hand in Hand Zimbabwe is doing through the Green Enterprise Project is in line with the government’s effort to eradicate hunger through planting fruit trees and we commend it,” he said.

Government officials and community members in attendance took some time to tour and plant trees in the garden.

The garden, which is run by 45 members, has 1083 trees that include guavas, lemons, paw paws and mangoes among others. The members are selling the trees for $15 each.

Since the Green Enterprise Project’s s inception close to 12 months ago, the project has established three apiaries, five tree nurseries, and five nutritional gardens with a provision of fodder for cattle and goat fattening.

The project has also created 34 green enterprises that have in turn provided 490 green jobs since inception.

HiHZim GEP project flourishing

Hand in Hand Zimbabwe (HiHZim) is heavily involved in projects that mitigate #Cimate Change through Green Enterprise (GE) Interventions.

For instance, the organisation was instrumental in establishing a GE pilot project in Gwanda, which has notched some positive impact in the area.

HiH Zim’s Chief Executive Officer recently toured Gwanda to have an appreciation of the project and was privileged to meet members of Progressive Self Help Group in ward 14, Phakamani and Sinalidau SHGs in ward 20 and Guyu in Sengezane Village.

The Groups have thriving tree nurseries in the hot and dry region, and plans are afoot for the teams to participate in this year’s national tree planting day in early December.

Since the Green Enterprise Project’s s inception close to 12 months ago, the project has established three apiaries, five lush tree nurseries, and five nutritional gardens with capacity to provide fodder for cattle and goat fattening.

The project has also created 490 green jobs and 34 green enterprises in the past year.

HiHZim hosts Plumtree market linkages mini-fair

Hand in Hand Zimbabwe (HiHZim) is this week hosting a mini fair in Plumtree in a bid to link rural entrepreneurs with larger markets.

The trade fair, which is being held in partnership with the Ministry of Youth, Sport, Arts and Recreation from October 21 to 25 at 4JS Plumtree, will see entrepreneurs from Bulilima District selling their wares to a bigger audience.

Most entrepreneurs and business upstarts in Zimbabwe fail to grow due to lack of access to markets and finance. However, Hand in Hand Zimbabwe constantly links entrepreneurs under its portfolio with both local and international markets at various platforms as part of strategies to reduce poverty and empower people in marginalised areas.

Brighton Dube, HiHZim Plumtree Area Manager, said the purpose of the mini fair is to expose the entrepreneurs that the organisation is working with in Bulilima and also help facilitate market linkages within Plumtree Town.

He added that the platform will also enable HIHZim supported entrepreneurs from various wards to share experiences and skills on how to improve product quality.

“We are bringing entrepreneurs from all eight wards that we are operating in to exhibit and showcase their various enterprises,” Dube said.

“We want entrepreneurs to interact with the market, explain how they make their products, outline the challenges they face so that potential buyers and stakeholders get to appreciate the challenges and potential that they people have.

“We believe this interface will nurture a collaborative effort with the Plumtree community in supporting and assisting the entrepreneurs,” Dube said.

Products and wares to be exhibited include traditional foods, crafts and household material.

The Mini-Fair is being hosted under the Hand in Hand Zimbabwe Market Linkages Project, which aims at increasing the market share of entrepreneurs supported by Hand in Hand Zimbabwe. This will translate into increased household incomes and sustainable enterprises.

The project, which seeks to reinforce access to markets and finance for entrepreneurs supported by Hand in Hand Zimbabwe, focuses on complimenting already established enterprises under JCP, MEY, Green Enterprises and CUP.

This will be achieved through strengthening access to finance and market linkages in selected value chains such as horticulture, small livestock, apiculture and food processing in order to boost productivity, competitiveness, high income and sustainability.

MLP is being implemented in seven districts of operation namely Bulilima, Chikomba, Chirumanzu, Gwanda, Lupane, Nkayi and Shurugwi.

The three-year project, which commenced in June 2019, is set to end in December 2020 and targets 512 entrepreneurs.  It is fully funded by the Osterberg Foundation.

What took you so Long Media Documents HiHZim Work

Last week we hosted film-maker and photographer Ghinwa Daher from Lebanon .
The purpose of Ghinwa’s visit was to capture a documentary of two groups supported by Handinhand Zimbabwe under the Motivated & Entrepreneurial Youth Project (MEY) in Chirumanzu and Shurugwi districts respectively.

In Chirumanzu, Ginhwa took time to capture Chisungo Investments, a pot moulding family business that has performed remarkably. While in Shurugwi, Ghinwa also documented a group that has established flea markets and a grocery shop enterprise under the MEY Project.

The documentary will be used for fundraising purposes to replicate and scale up MEY in the aforementioned districts and three (3) more districts in the country going forward.

The documentary will be uploaded on the Hand in Hand Zimbabwe website to serve as motivation to other youth to engage in #socio-economic resilient interventions.

Restore 600 rural women’s livelihoods in Zimbabwe

Hand in Hand Zimbabwe recently got accepted to this incredible site called Global Giving. It’s a huge opportunity for us to raise enough money to restore 600 rural women’s livelihoods in Bulilima District, Plumtree through building a world class solar hatchery for them.
This campaign is huge exposure for us and starting today, we have 16 days to raise 50 000 from 40 unique donors, it seems manageable but we are going to need as much help as we can get from you!

Help us spread this message to your respective networks.

Every little bit counts. Follow the link below to access our Global Giving donate page.

Hand in Hand Zimbabwe on Cyclone Idai relief

Cyclone Idai Relief

Hand in Hand Zimbabwe recently assisted 73 families who lost their homes to Cyclone Idai with building material and food items.Cyclone Idai left a huge trail of destruction in Chimanimani and also affected households in Chikomba, Chirumanzu and Shurugwi where the organisation operates.The 73 families assisted are only part of the vast populace affected. Many families in the districts remain exposed and in need of humanitarian support. Restoring Livelihoods is a key component in building socio-economically resilient communities. Watch video below for highlights.Handinhand ZimbabweZimbabwe Red Cross SocietyHand in Hand Eastern AfricaHand in Hand SwedenGlobalGivingUSAID – US Agency for International DevelopmentYourCauseBenevityLetwin Natasha NyambayoCourage MuchecheGeorge BayaAshley DazhAtherton MavhungaWashington ChimalizeniEmbassy of Sweden in Harare

Posted by Hand In Hand Zimbabwe on Tuesday, June 4, 2019

Hand in Hand Zimbabwe recently assisted 73 families who lost their homes to Cyclone Idai with building material and food items.

Cyclone Idai left a huge trail of destruction in Chimanimani and also affected households in Chikomba, Chirumanzu and Shurugwi where the organisation operates.

The 73 families assisted are only part of the vast populace affected. Many families in the districts remain exposed and in need of humanitarian support.

Restoring Livelihoods is a key component in building socio-economically resilient communities.

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Caroline’s story

ACHIEVING real progress regarding the situation of women in society has, for a number of years, been a priority for, Hand in Hand Zimbabwe (HHZ),  a non-profit organisation which helps resource limited and marginalised people in rural communities, through jobs creation.

A case in point is that of a 55-year-old Caroline Nkala from Lupane who before she met Hand in Hand Zimbabwe could barely afford to take care of and pay school fees for her seven children. 

Many thanks to HHZ who came to her rescue as she is now a proud owner of a grocery shop that has completely changed her life.

 “Before joining Hand in Hand, I was facing a lot of challenges in my life and marriage such as failure to buy food and pay my children’s school fees. The situation was made worse because my husband was unemployed,” said Nkala.

This is because due to the economic instability, employment opportunities are scarce in most rural set-ups in Zimbabwe where a majority of people survive on subsistence agriculture.

Nkala who now affords to pay school fees amounting to $40 for each of her seven children, joined HHZ in 2015 under the Garia SHG. 

The group comprises seven members (6 women and a man) who contribute $8 per month. 

To start her escape route from poverty, in 2016, Caroline borrowed $500 from the group and managed to build a grocery store where she sells food items and detergents.

She built the store after going through the Hand in Hand Opportunity Identification module. 

“After going through the business entrepreneurship trainings from Hand in Hand Zimbabwe, I realised that there were a lot of opportunities in my community that I can utilize to make a successful living. That led me to open a profitable grocery store since no similar service was available in my community.

 “I make a significant profit of between $650 to $700 per month and I have since regained the money I used to build the shop,” she said.

In all this, the now successful businesswoman, boasts of the knowledge she got from HHZ saying the organisation taught her to be self-dependence as a woman, to work hard and to effectively manage her business.

  “Hand in Hand Zimbabwe has moulded me into a visionary. Building a shop in a rural set up was not easy but I managed to do it because of the knowledge I acquired from the organisation”.

  Before she joined HHZ she was into horticulture but that source of livelihood was not profitable as she didn’t have the skills and knowledge to manage it.

 “Life was hard because I only managed to put a little food on the table and could not send my children to school. Selling vegetables could not sustain all my needs therefore, the intervention of Hand in Hand Zimbabwe was and is still of great help in my life”.  

Nkala said apart from taking her children to school, she is currently building a big house at her homestead from the grocery store income. 

 She is also is planning to grow bigger in her business despite the economic challenges in the country and to expand her business to other areas in Lupane.

HiH hosts inaugural schools competitions

Hand in Hand Zimbabwe on Friday held its inaugural schools’ competition, which ran concurrently in Chirumanzu and Shurugwi, as part of the organisation’s desire to equip students with knowledge and skills in motivation, health and entrepreneurship under its Motivated and Entrepreneurial Youth Project (MEY)

The competition, which ran under the theme “Building a motivated, healthy and entrepreneurial youth begins now”, attracted 15 schools in each district.

In Chirumanzu, Leopold Takawarira Secondary School took the first prize, followed by Hillview Secondary School and Siyahokwe Secondary school which came second and third, respectively, in the quiz competitions.

In the poetry competitions, Mukomberamwa Secondary School took the first prize, while Leopold Tawawira High school took the second and Driefontein High School the third.

In Shurugwi, Chironde Secondary school took the first prize , while Kushinga Secondary and Zviumwa Secondary took the second and third prize respectively in the quiz competitions.

In the poetry competitions in the  district, Kushinga Secondary took the first prize, Gato Secondary the second and Bokai the third prize.

On top of the trophies, winning teams walked away with stationery and prize money, which will go towards starting enterprises or scaling up of existing ones.

Other schools that did not make it to the podium also received consolation prices which included stationery and Hand in Hand Zimbabwe Star for life t-shirts.

Various stakeholders from Government Ministries, National Aids Council, Midlands Aids Service Organisation (MASO) and educationists were in attendance at the schools competitions.

Hand in Hand Zimbabwe MEY Project Coordinator Rejoyce Moyo said the schools competition is part of the Motivated Entrepreneurial Youth (MEY) learning project, where Hand in Hand works with schools and train students in entrepreneurship and health as a way of equipping them for the future.

“The competition component is a new initiative that came about through interactions we have had with school patrons who believe that for the students to remain motivated and interested in MEY activities, we should bring in an element of competition and rewards,” she said in an interview.

“After careful considerations we couldn’t think of a better way of testing the knowledge that we would have imparted into students, with regards to entrepreneurship, than a schools competition. Through the MEY Project students are trained in health, motivation and entrepreneurship, so there is a need that we  test the knowledge that they have gained through training sessions. This knowledge will be tested through quiz, poetry and drama competitions,” she said.

Chirumanzu Acting District Schools Inspector Bornface Chimbiya said the schools competition is a good initiative as it supports the National Schools’ curriculum.

He commended Hand in Hand Zimbabwe for the work it is doing in Chirumanzu and Shurugwi through the MEY project

“The work Hand in Hand Zimbabwe is doing is the first of its kind in our district, where schools are so involved, teachers and learners are given so much prominence, we haven’t had this kind of exposure for a long time in our districts and this thrust of the new curriculum is being immensely supported.

“Hand in Hand Zimbabwe is doing a wonderful peace of work which I would urge other organisations to emulate because the practical skills that our learners are acquiring will go a long way in enhancing what we are doing in the new curriculum,” he said.

Chimbiya added that the hands on approach being advocated by the programme equips students with practical skills they can apply to their daily lives, at school and in the community.

“That kind of impact is what the new curriculum is focusing on,” he said.

Chimbiya also said learners should be consistently exposed to the competition as it keeps them motivated to continue learning.

“Some of the students come from schools that are in remote areas and this opportunity to meet with colleagues a very important experience, the sharing of ideas and the moulding of friendships. I feel it should be done on a more regular basis,” he said.

Midlands Aids Service Organisation (MASO) Programmes manager Jabulani Mapingire said their partnership with Hand in Hand Zimbabwe on running the programme has been very fruitful.

“The project has greatly impacted lives of students as accurate information pertaining health, entrepreneurship and motivation is being disseminated.

“This has positioned these youngsters at the right place, as they are getting information at an early age before they even experiment, to a point that even when they want to experiment, they do with full knowledge of the consequences,” he said.

Deovelance Mpofu, a 16-year-old form four student at Driefontein, said she and 20 other Star-for-life club members under the MEY Project have managed to open a tuckshop at their school where they sell fresh chips and make profits of up to $2 000.

The Hand in Hand Project MEY project contributes to sustainable development in Zimbabwe through improving health awareness, motivating the youth to believe in themselves and providing entrepreneurial skills among students (13-18 yrs) and young adults (18-35 years) who are out of school.

The three-year project commenced in April 2017 and will end in March 2019. The project is in line with the Sustainable Development Goals 1, 3 and 17 and with UNAIDS 90-90-90 goal of eradicating HIV.

The MEY project contributes to sustainable development in Zimbabwe through Improving health awareness and entrepreneurial motivation among adolescents who attend school (15-18 years).  This is achieved by offering customized training to strengthen the school children self-confidence, motivation and hope for the future.

The training is based on health and motivational programs, combined with an inspiring introduction to the training in entrepreneurship. The project also aims at strengthening health awareness, self-esteem and motivation of the unemployed and disadvantaged young people (18-35 years) who are not in school. The project component targets the unemployed youth who dropped out of school, or find themselves in vulnerable situations.

These are mobilized into social and economic “Star Clubs” where they get a tailor- made training based on health and motivational programs and complete entrepreneurship training. The expected project outcomes are 1) An increase of young men and women’s (15-35 years) motivation and capacity to maintain good health and livelihoods and 2) An increase in strengthening health awareness, motivation and economic activity of young people who are not in school (unemployed and disadvantaged young people, 18-35 years).

This project is implemented in Shurugwi and Chirumanzu districts collaboratively with all the relevant Government of Zimbabwe Line Ministries, Arms and Departments. Three (3) strategic partners, Hand in Hand Zimbabwe, an enterprise development oriented organization, Midlands Aids Services Organisation (MASO) who have extensive experience in health awareness and Star for Life (South Africa) who are experts in motivation coordinate the project.

Hand in Hand Zimbabwe is a non-Profit organization that helps resource limited and marginalized people in rural communities, particularly women, to create better livelihoods for themselves and their families through its flagship series, the Jobs Creation Programme (JCP).

JCP encompasses a self-help approach that is premised on a four pillar model involving social mobilization into self-help groups (SHGs),training in entrepreneurship and economic development, facilitating access to microloans and facilitating market linkages and value addition.

Apart from the Jobs Creation Programme, the organisation has over the past three years incepted the Motivated and Entrepreneurial Youth (MEY) Project, Community Upliftment Project (CUP), Green Enterprises Project (GEP) and Jobs for Zimbabwe.

The organisation was registered as a non-profit trust in Zimbabwe in July 2015 and is presently supporting communities in seven districts namely Bulilima, Chikomba, Chirumanzu, Gwanda, Lupane, Nkayi and Shurugwi.

Hand Future Trust Zimbabwe is part of the HIH Network. The Network is a group of Hand in Hand organizations that have a global shared vision to alleviate poverty through job creation.

HiH Zim work gets media recognition in the Daily News.

8000 women, youth get entrepreneurship training

Hand in Hand Zimbabwe, a local non-profit organisation, is this year targeting to empower 80 percent of disadvantaged women and young girls in seven national districts it is operating in through its poverty alleviation interventions.

HIH is using its five key projects, implemented in Bulilima, Nkayi, Gwanda, Chikomba, Shurugwi, Churumanzu and Lupane, to bring about economic transformation to various women living in these marginalised areas.  

Since 2015, the organisation has supported over 8000 women and youth through entrepreneurship training and access to credits for resource limited and marginalised people living in the above mentioned districts.

Research has shown that women are key drivers of economic growth and that wealth in the hands of women leads to much more equitable outcomes in terms of the quality of life of families and communities.

Hand in Hand Zimbabwe Deputy Director of Programs Emmanuel Makiwa said the organisation decided to target 80 percent women after realising that the shrinking economic activities in the country have caused a perceivable reduction in household incomes and left 80 percent of the population, mostly located in rural areas, living below the World Bank international poverty line of US$1.90 per day (established 2015) and women and youth are among the most affected groups.

“These highly vulnerable groups are the most prone to suffer economic, social and environmental shocks. At the same time, they represent fundamental pillars of the Zimbabweans´ communities. Women are predominantly the breadwinners in the rural areas and are the primary keeper of the household,” he said in an interview.

“Despite their key role, they often dispose only of a fraction of the generated income and own a nominal percentage of assets in terms of land, farming and credit. In addition, rural women have limited space in decision-making and economic development in both the family and community,” Makiwa added.

He further indicated that youths are also largely excluded from the economic development.

With diminishing opportunities for formal employment and secure incomes, most young people are highly dependent on their families and are forced to subsist on informal economic activities.

“Those who should be driving the regeneration of the Zimbabwean economy are instead the ones most threatened by decreasing opportunities in terms of employment and investments,” Makiwa said.

He noted that the organisation will continue to support women and youth entrepreneurs in rural areas through entrepreneurial technical skills training, marketing and business managerial skills such as savings and elementary financial management.

HIH will also strive to provide a fund to support some of the emerging businesses in the marginalised areas.

Makiwa said inadequate entrepreneurial and technical skills, as well as financial support and market linkage have been a major hindrance for women and youth entrepreneurs in the rural areas

“The absence and inaccessibility to microfinance schemes is another element that has adversely hindered development opportunities for rural entrepreneurs. Insufficient funds to create or enhance economic activities are often the reason at the basis of the inability to escape the poverty trap,” he said.   

Most rural folks are facing high economic vulnerability, social exclusion and, in many cases, food insecurity.

Jennifer Kabete a beneficiary from rural Shurugwi, who now owns a viable business in the district, said HIH is really working tirelessly to empower women in rural Zimbabwe.

“Most women in this district have been empowered by Hand in Hand Zimbabwe and I pray that they continue to reach out to more,” she said.

The conditions of these rural vulnerable groups are further worsened by the degrading conditions of the local environment.

Frequent droughts have become a common feature of the region, with severe droughts occurring every 3-5 years.

These social, economic and environmental conditions are particularly harsh in both Matabeleland North and South regions.

The two provinces are some of the least developed in terms of infrastructure, hence employment opportunities are limited.

Several other philanthropists, government and nonprofit organisations have, however, slipped in to help the rural folk. Recently Econet founder Strive Masiyiwa and his wife Tsitsi announced a US$100 million revolving fund for the support of rural businesses in Zimbabwe.

Hand in Hand Zimbabwe is a non-Profit organization that helps resource limited and marginalized people in rural communities, particularly women, to create better livelihoods for themselves and their families through its flagship series, the Jobs Creation Programme (JCP).

JCP encompasses a self-help approach that is premised on a four pillar model involving Social mobilization into self-help groups (SHGs), Training in entrepreneurship and economic development, Facilitating access to microloans and Facilitating market linkages and value addition.

Apart from the Jobs Creation Programme, the organisation has over the past three years incepted the Motivated and Entrepreneurial Youth (MEY) Project, Community Upliftment Project (CUP), Green Enterprises Project (GEP) and Jobs for Zimbabwe.

The organisation is presently supporting communities in seven districts namely Bulilima, Chikomba, Chirumanzu, Gwanda, Lupane, Nkayi and Shurugwi.

Hand in Hand Future Trust Zimbabwe is part of the HIH Network. The Network is a group of Hand in Hand organizations that have a global shared vision to alleviate poverty through job creation.

HIH Zimbabwe also commits itself to implementing sustainable interventions that contribute to the attainment of Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) such as No poverty, Zero Hunger, Good health and well being, Gender Equity, Climate Action, Life on land and Partnerships for the goals.

A Message from Our CEO on International Women’s Day

Today, the Hand in Hand Zimbabwe team joins the global community in celebrating this year’s International Women’s Day, which is running under the theme #BalanceforBetter.

As we commemorate this important day about “women’s achievements throughout history and across nations” that is observed each year on March 8, my special thoughts go to all those women, worldwide, who on this day, are still struggling to lead a decent life – particularly those who live in drought-prone and marginalised areas.

Today is an opportune time to reflect on the important role women play in supporting a sustainable future for all and as HIH are work is particularly focused on women who have struggled to financially support themselves and their families, but have managed to break the barriers of poverty through our influence.

We celebrate our female entrepreneurs who have defied odds and are nurturing viable businesses to date.  We celebrate the mindset shifts, and the outcomes we have obtained in our women empowerment drive as an organisation.

Empowering women is a great responsibility. It is necessary for gender equality. A society is better when women are not taken for granted and are given equal respect. In the past, women were generally restricted to the home and were not allowed to step out of the house for work. Household chores were their only area of work. But today’s society has seen a lot of changes.

Our generation values women and entrust them with amazing responsibilities. Women are given equal opportunities at work and are allowed to stand among, and sometimes ahead of, men in many fields.

Today, women are slowly realizing their strengths and abilities, and they are ready to step out of their home, contributing to the success of their home and the entire society. They are indeed making the world turn heads towards them. Before it was not possible, but now it is a reality.

For the past few years our main target has been, and will continue to be, the empowerment of at least 80 percent of disadvantaged women and young girls in the seven national districts we operate in through our poverty alleviation interventions.

At HIH we have committed ourselves to implementing sustainable interventions that contribute in fighting life-threatening challenges such as poverty, inequality, and violence against women.

We firmly believe in gender equality and we are proud to say that the majority of our employees are female – in every department and at all levels.

As such, I would also like to extend a special thank you to all our brilliant staff (men included), who are helping to create a more gender-inclusive world in their respective works.

Gender equality and poverty are closely connected. Often, women face unique and sometimes disproportionate burdens when poverty is at play.

To that end, Hand in Hand is working on ensuring that women are economically empowered for the betterment of their future.

Our success hinges on investment in women and this entails supporting their full and equal participation in fruitful economic activities

Happy women’s day

Chirumanzu students defy the odds

Three teenagers from Rambakombwe Secondary school in Chirumanzu District have defied the odds after they successfully set up a solar-powered barbershop at their school with the aid of  Hand in Hand Zimbabwe and their two patrons.

The three young entrepreneurs, Praymore Nzombe 16,  John Kakoni 15 and Tafara Chivige 18 are part of the Hand in Hand Zimbabwe’s Motivated & Entrepreneurial Youth Programme (MEY) Star  Club, which contributes to sustainable development in the country through improving health awareness.

The programme also motivates youths to believe in themselves and provide entrepreneurial skills among adolescents at schools (13-18 years) and the Out of School youths aged between 18 and 35 years.

The young students commenced operations in July last year after going through extensive training on life skills and entrepreneurship from the Hand in Hand Zimbabwe.

With the aid of their patrons, the three bought two electric scissors, borrowed the school’s solar power and started servicing the community and other school children during lunch hour for $1 per head.

In an interview one of the two boys Praymore said he learnt that one can make a living by starting a business venture at an early age after going through the MEY project entrepreneurship training.

“We were motivated to start the business by the desire to help our parents to fend for the family. We don’t come from rich families and we are hoping that we will be able to pay our school fees and do other things at home with the money we get,” he said.

The other entrepreneur John said they have plans to diversify their operations and have already started buying rabbits and traditional chickens (road runners) for resale.

“We want to grow our business so that in the future we will be able to employ other young people in this district as well,” he said.

Dumisani Nkiwane, a skills patron at the school, said he was proud of the two boys and will continue supporting them.

“The boy’s idea of starting a businesses started at the Hand in Hand Zimbabwe’s star club under the MEY project last year and in partnership with the organisation we have guided them from the business proposals stage,” he said.

Dumisani added that he was impressed by the fact that the two boys’ intention was to get money to further their education, create employment and help their parents at home when they came up with the business idea.

Rambakombwe headmaster Tafadzwanashe Chese commended Hand in Hand Zimbabwe for the work that the organisation is doing at the school.

“I can safely say – without hesitation – that Hand in Hand Zimbabwe has become a part of us. The organisation is actually working hand in hand with Rambakombwe secondary school,” he said.

Mr Chese further indicated that HiH was indeed empowering both his school and the individuals who make up the institution.

“The idea of having learners who are affiliated to the organisation who are running a viable barbershop during lunch hour is impressive,” he said.

He said through the MEY project, students have been equipped to manage the barbershop business and have proper income and balance sheet statements.

Mr Chese noted that the organisation’s interventions have also helped with raising the pass rate at his school and will go a long way in helping the students.

The Hand in Hand Zimbabwe MEY project extends to 30 schools in Chirumanzu and Shurugwi district respectively. Most schools in the two district confirmed that they have recorded positive impact through the project.

Chirumanzu district Schools’ Inspector Bornface Chimbiya said the entrepreneurship training being availed by the organisation are in tandem with the new curriculum which includes skills training.

“There is a lot of impact being made through the Hand in Hand MEY project at schools in Chirumanzu. Children are getting more skills and becoming responsible at an early age as can be noted by the barbershop project.

“They are able to get hands on experience from projects they are doing with Hand in Hand Zimbabwe,” he said.

Mr Chimbiya said the Primary and Secondary Education Ministry is looking forward to more collaborative work with the non-profit organisation and hope to get more support in terms of resources, workshops.

Hand in Hand Zimbabwe is a non-Profit organization that helps resource limited and marginalized people in rural communities, particularly women, to create better livelihoods for themselves and their families through its flagship series, the Jobs Creation Programme (JCP) which aims at alleviating poverty through job creation.

JCP also encompasses a self-help approach that is premised on a four pillar model involving social mobilization into self-help groups (SHGs), training in entrepreneurship and economic development, facilitating access to microloans and facilitating market linkages and value addition.

Apart from the Jobs Creation Programme approach, the organisation has over the years implemented the Motivated and Entrepreneurial Youth (MEY) Project, Community Upliftment Project (CUP), Green Enterprises Project (GEP) and Jobs for Zimbabwe.

The organisation was registered as a non-profit organisation in Zimbabwe in July 2015 and is presently supporting communities in seven districts namely Bulilima, Chikomba, Chirumanzu, Gwanda, Lupane, Nkayi and Shurugwi.

The two patrons and Hand in Hand Star Club members pose for a picture with the barbershop equipment

HIH refreshes drought-prone Shurugwi

Meandering through the different wards in Shurugwi district, 32 km (21 miles) to the South of Gweru, one cannot help but notice the drying crops, which have borne the brunt of hot weather patterns being experienced in some parts of the country.

Shurugwi, which is in natural region four, is characterised by poor rains and is perennially prone to droughts resulting in most people in the area being hinged to the poverty trap as their livelihoods are not sustainable.

The situation is however, about to change, with gratitude to a local organisation Hand in Hand Zimbabwe, which has trained and equipped approximately 11 percent of the people in the district with entrepreneurial skills that will potentially shift their focus from surviving on agriculture.

This intervention has come through in a bid to improve the lives of vulnerable people in the district and has transformed people into successful entrepreneurs.

Through its Jobs Creation Programme, Hand in Hand Zimbabwe has taught people in the rural community, modern ways of saving money and starting successful enterprises.

In an interview Shurugwi Agritex Supervisor David Barnabas, said although the region is clearly heading for a major drought due to the wilting of crops, most villagers will be sustained by business skills they have received from the organisation.

“The situation is bad, there is going to be a serious drought here, I foresee a drought as crops have dried up.

However, I commend Hand in Hand Zimbabwe for the work that they are doing as villagers here can now generate their own income and do not solely depend on agricultural produce,” he said.

Barnabas applauded Hand in Hand for the business trainings and mentoring the organisation conducted, adding that these will eliminate donor syndrome and will enable villagers to be self-dependent.

Ward 24 Shurugwi Councillor Norman Sibindi encouraged more villagers to join Hand in Hand programmes, which empower people to be self-sufficient and self-reliant, especially during drought periods.

“We want to see people who are doing well and have something to live for as things are now hard in the nation.

“We want to see women and youths in this village who do not depend on men,” he said.

The Hand in Hand, Jobs Creation Program targets at least 80% women in support of Millennium Development Goal 3, which aims at promote gender equality and empower women.

Shurugwi Ministry of Youth Entrepreneurship and skills trainings Supervisor Elijah Mutero said Hand in Hand has contributed 20 percent of youth employment since 2015 and improved livelihoods of many.

“Nutritional value in the district has improved due to the work Hand in Hand is doing. The organisation is sustaining life through various projects and we hope that in a few years’ time our district would be free from poverty.

“At the moment we are witnessing a significant reduction in delinquencies as most young people are kept busy and are eking out a decent living.”

Mutero added that the projects have helped in shifting the attention of youths from taking drugs, gambling and other toxic behaviour.

Hand in Hand in Zimbabwe Chief Executive officer Felix Tete said the organisation will continue training and supporting poor and marginalised people in rural Zimbabwe to create better livelihoods.

Graceful Shumba a villager who benefited from Hand in Hand said the organisation has indeed empowered many entrepreneurs in Shurugwi through trainings.

“In 2013 I was known as the feeble-looking tailor who sat behind a shop at Chachacha doing her daily sewing routine. However, six years later I’m now a proud owner of a vibrant shop – the one I used to sit behind.

“Like many women here in Shurugwi, I worked hard to make ends meet in the drought and hunger prone district, but without the right knowledge and skills, it was an uphill task.

“As fate would have it, my life dramatically changed when I met Hand in Hand Zimbabwe in 2015 the organisation and received business development and financial literacy training ,” she said.

Hand in Hand Zimbabwe is a non-Profit organization that helps resource limited and marginalized people in rural communities, particularly women, to create better livelihoods for themselves and their families through its flagship series, the Jobs Creation Programme (JCP) which aims at alleviating poverty through jobs creation.

JCP also encompasses a self-help approach that is premised on a four pillar development model involving social mobilization into self-help groups (SHGs), training in entrepreneurship and economic development, facilitating access to microloans and facilitating market linkages and value addition.

Apart from the Jobs Creation Programme approach, the organisation has over the years implemented the Motivated and Entrepreneurial Youth (MEY) Project, Community Upliftment Project (CUP), Green Enterprises Project (GEP) and Jobs for Zimbabwe.

The organisation was registered as a non-profit organisation in Zimbabwe in July 2015 and is presently supporting communities in seven districts namely Bulilima, Chikomba, Chirumanzu, Gwanda, Lupane, Nkayi and Shurugwi.

From sitting behind a shop to owning it – Shumba’s story

In 2013 Graceful Shumba, 39, was known as the feeble-looking tailor who sat behind a shop at Chachacha doing her daily sewing routine. However, six years later Graceful has become the proud owner of vibrant shop – the one she used to sit behind.

Like many women in Chachacha, Graceful worked hard to make ends meet in the drought and hunger prone district, but without the right knowledge and skills, it was always going to be an uphill task.

As fate would have it, Graceful’s life dramatically changed when she met Hand in Hand Zimbabwe in 2013, after which she joined the Batanai Self Help Group which consists of 10 women.

The organisation took the women through a six-month training in which they were taught 6 Hand in Hand business modules.

The women contributed $50 per month at a 20% return rate and this helped their individual businesses to grow. Within six months, the group’s revenue topped $5 000, which they shared equally among themselves. Each woman walked away with over $500.

In November 2015 the owner of the shop which Graceful used to sit behind decided to sell the shop and the 39-year lady, who had gone through the module Opportunity Identification and Enterprise planning, did not think twice about the offer and promptly borrowed money from her Self Help Group to secure the shop.

Equipped with her new entrepreneurial skills, she quickly divided the shop into three departments – a grocery store, a tailoring shop and a takeaway restaurant.

Without wasting any time, Graceful stocked her grocery store with the profits she had made from the tailoring business.

“It’s worth noting that I only started making notable profits in my tailoring business after going through the Hand in Hand Zimbabwe managing module,” she recalls.

Within six years, Graceful had risen from being a hopeless tailor to a shop manager and created jobs for young women in her community who work at her budding enterprise as a store keeper, an assistant tailor and a cook.

“Hand in hand has taught me to manage my business from implementation stage up to where I am now. I was taught how to expand my business from a small enterprise to one of the biggest businesses in this district.

“Before I met Hand in Hand I was in living in abject poverty, there was no hope for the future and things were hard,” she said.

Graceful’s success is not only in words, but she has a lot to show for it and has become an inspiration to many people in her area.

“I used to stay in a one-roomed house but from the excess profits I have made over the years, I have managed to build a 9 roomed house. In addition, I have also managed to buy two family cars and a commuter omnibus, which we use to transfer our goods from different wholesales,” she said.

“I make a profit of more than $1000 each month, which I use to pay school fees for my two children and a nephew,” she added.

The 39 year old mother says she will continue to be part of Hand in Hand Zimbabwe’s Batanai Self Help group and is looking forward to learn more from the organisation.

“The sky is now the limit for me. If all goes well I am planning to open another shop in Shurugwi town. My vision is to empower as many women as possible,” she said.

 

GWANDA CATTLE FATTENING PROJECT PAYS OFF

Bambanani Self Help group members made a profit of $5 666,48 after they sold their 12 cows at one of Zimbabwe’s largest abattoirs.The group from Ngoma Village 20 in Gwanda sold the cows for $12 578,48 following the completion of a Hand in Hand Zimbabwe supported cattle fattening project.

The group which was formed in 2018 comprises of 11 members (8 females and 3 males) who expressed interest on cattle fattening and the lessons conducted by Hand in Hand Zimbabwe on Module 3: Opportunity Identification and Enterprise.

In May 2018, the SHG attended the cattle fattening training which was organized by Hand in Hand Zimbabwe and facilitated by the ward-based facilitator from the Crop and Livestock Department.

The technical skills training impacted the SHG with deeper knowledge and skills on cattle fattening and they started saving $20 each on a monthly basis.  The group members borrowed the money amongst themselves at an interest rate of 20% per month as this was meant to grow the fund for cattle fattening project.

The group managed to gather 11 cows valued at $3 500 and monthly savings worth $2 645 which was used to purchase and transport stock feeds from Gwanda Town.

On the 6th of October 2018, the pen fattening process started and the 11 cows were fattened for a period of two (2) months. Shortening the fattening period was deliberate as during the rainy season most cows gain weight due to the availability of green grass and water.

The group’s dedication and commitment resulted in them being part of the SHGs that were taken for a look and learn visit at Matopos Research Institute on 18 July 2018. The aim of the look and learn visit was for the SHGs to learn more about cattle fattening.

These experiences provided the participants with access to knowledge and information about cattle fattening, which gradually gave them greater empowerment. As a result, this look and learn visit enabled the Bambanani SHG to further design a methodology that improved the preparation, organization and adoption of new practices for cattle fattening.

The look and learn visit further instilled in-depth understanding on cattle fattening practices which led to the success of their business venture.

The expenses incurred during the project life cycle included value of purchasing cows, stock feeds, vaccines and transport costs which amounted to $6 912. The gross income realized was $12 578.48 and this enabled the Bambanani SHG to make profit of $5 666.48. The members paid themselves and each got $50 and the rest of the money remaining ($9 450.00) will be invested back into the project in the next production phase.

In an interview, the team leader Hawelo Moyo 55 said the initiative had immensely transformed the lives of group members as they moved from being mere poverty stricken villagers to being business people who can actually sell to national abattoirs.

He commended Hand in Hand Zimbabwe for the modules training and guidance citing that it had contributed to the growth of their enterprise.

“Hand in hand has helped us by teaching us on technical skills training, cattle fattening and linking us to the market

“Personally before meeting Hand in Hand Zimbabwe I never thought I would be able to manage such a viable business,” he said.

The table below shows the amount the SHG sold their fattened cows after being linked to Cold Storage Commission abattoir in Bulawayo

Cattle No.GradeWeight (kg)Amount ($)
1Super224.21 745.56
2Super214.21 665.56
3Super191.21 481.56
4Choice176.51 270.80
5Choice158.51 109.50
6Choice150.51 083.60
7Choice139.51 004.40
8Choice128.5925.20
9Choice127.5918.90
10Economy114.5721.35
11Economy103.5652.05
  Total$12 578.48
Prices/kg   
Super        $7.75  
Choice      $7.20  
Economy $6.30  

Hand in Hand Zimbabwe 2019 planning session

Hand in Hand Zimbabwe 2019 planning session

The Hand in Hand Zimbabwe team recently completed its week-long 2019 planning session with the organisation committing to seeking funding to support communities in the seven districts it operates in. The new projects will seek to deal with poverty, which has escalated in the past few months due to the country’s harsh economic environment.

HiH Zimbabwe’s Community Upliftment Project, which was only being implemented in Bulilima and Chikomba, will be gradually extended to cover all seven districts as part of strategies to fight poverty at a large scale among rural households.

Poverty alleviation through jobs creation, women and youth empowerment remains HiH Zimbabwe’s main focus in 2019.

HIH Zim also commits itself to implementing sustainable interventions that contribute to the attainment of the following Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs):

No poverty

Zero Hunger

Good health and well being

Gender Equity

Climate Action

Life on land

Partnerships for the goals

Southern African NGOs in drive to empower the Namibian girl child

Star for Life Southern Africa and Hand in Hand Zimbabwe have launched a Daughters of Africa program that will see, the equality, entrepreneurship and sexual reproductive health gap in teenagers being addressed by 2030 in Namibia and South Africa respectively.

The program is set to benefit hundreds of high school students in 88 schools in South Africa and Namibia with the aim of reducing young women’s risk of violence and sexual exploitation, strengthening their control over their sexual and reproductive health and creating opportunities to secure economic independence for them.

In an interview, Star for life Southern Africa Program Development Manager, Christine Joao said the program which focuses on sexual reproductive health, reducing gender based violence through empowering girls and boys and promoting entrepreneurial skills is aligned with national efforts to reaching Sustainable Development Goals by 2030.

She indicated that the Namibia Vision 2030 is a framework for a curriculum that will foster individual excellence as well as promote values and skills for community development.

“Star for Life’s training manuals will be developed and clarified and 12 coaches will be employed to allow more time per school, thereby increasing attendance and training opportunities.

“Other natural actors will also be involved – such as custodians, school leaders, school staff, local health clinics and authorities. Hand in Hand Zimbabwe will help train Star for Life’s entrepreneurship staff,” she said.

Hand in Hand Zimbabwe Chief Executive Officer Felix Tete said the project seeks to rescue young people from structural poverty and inequality in Namibia and South Africa.

“Our project seeks to counter a culture of disempowerment that is several generations deep.

He said through the project they will assist schools in formulating a Code of Conduct that explicitly addresses the lack of equality and respect in all forms.

“We also want to produce increased awareness of gender issues in learners and teachers and create a school environment that promotes gender equality,” he said.

He added that the project Daughters of Africa is an example of how funders and NGOs come together to help realize the goals that governments have set for the advancement of their populations within the framework of the Sustainable Development Goals.

The project is being funded by Stars for Life Sweden and Hand in Hand Sweden.

Star for life project was formed in 2005 based on the conviction that when you support young people to develop a healthy level of self-esteem and belief in their future, they will be inspired to perform well in several areas of life.

By early 2007, the Star for Life program was launched in Namibia. Today it is being implemented with success in 120 schools in South Africa and Namibia.

Hand in Hand Zimbabwe is a Non-governmental organisation whose main aim is to help poor and marginalised people create better livelihoods for themselves and their families in rural Zimbabwe.

This is done through a help to self-help approach, mainly aimed at women and youth.

Reprieve for Gwanda as Hundreds of Gwanda households are set to benefit from the Green Enterprise Programme

A local nongovernmental organisation Hand in Hand Zimbabwe has launched a Green Enterprise Programme in rural Gwanda which is set to benefit more than more than 200 individuals with economically and environmentally viable climate smart enterprises aimed at fighting poverty.

Through the programme a total of 300 people living in poverty and vulnerable situations in Gwanda district will benefit through the gardens that use green energy for provision of water and bee keeping interventions.

The individuals will also receive entrepreneurship and technical skills trainings.

Five horticultural gardens will be established and supported by the organisation through the drilling and installation of five community based boreholes equipped with solar driven water pumps while the bee keeping entrepreneurs will get support through bee hives and sheds.

In an interview Hand in Hand Chief Executive Officer Felix Tete said the project is meant to benefit 240 women and 60 men with skills and support that will diversify their livelihood options.

He said the project´s overall objective is to contribute to improved sustainable economic activities and strengthen resilience to climate change for women and youth in Gwanda district.

He added that the long term impacts of the programme will contribute to the attainment of Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) of no poverty, zero hunger and climate action by creating sustainable economic opportunities (green enterprises) that both support poverty eradication, equal rights to economic resources and integrate measures to mitigate the effects of climate change.

“The targeted groups for this program are extremely resource limited female headed households facing low incomes and food insecurity as well as challenges in looking after their children and other dependants within the households.

We are also targeting child headed families and vulnerable individuals belonging to highly marginalised groups such as orphan youth and people affected by HIV/AIDS,” he said.

Hand in Hand Zimbabwe Gwanda Area Manager Unami Dube said since the inception of the programme, the response from the district has been overwhelming.

She said the organisation is still on the selection process of the target groups in the most vulnerable communities in the district.

“The identification of target groups will be further supported by the collaboration and consultation with the traditional and other community leaders. This will help adding legitimacy to the project activities and avoiding potential risks of conflicts within the communities,” she said.

Hand in Hand Zimbabwe is a non-profit organisation whose main aim is to is to help poor and marginalised people create better livelihoods for themselves and their families in rural Zimbabwe.

This is done through a help to self-help approach, mainly aimed at women and youth.

Hand in Hand Zimbabwe´s approach is built upon a 4-step model consisting of social mobilisation into self-help groups, training in entrepreneurship and economic development, facilitating access to internal and external microloan scheme and market linkage and value addition.

Through its interventions, the organisation has made great strides in the fight against poverty in Lupane, Nkayi, Bulilima, Gwanda, Shurugwi, Chikomba and Chirumhanzu.